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Unit 27: Introduction to Personalisation in Care

Level: Level 3 Diploma
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1.1 Explain the term ‘personalisation’ as it applies in social care

Personalisation is a term used to describe the process of enabling individuals to have more control and choice over their healthcare and social care. It involves putting the individual at the centre of care and support so that the care and support they receive are tailored to their individual needs, preferences, and aspirations.

Personalisation is a key element of modern health and social care services, as it enables those who are receiving care and support to make informed decisions about their care and to take a more active role in managing their health and well-being. This is particularly important for those with long-term conditions or requiring complex care and support.

Personalised care involves giving individuals more control over the design, delivery, and monitoring of their care and support, to ensure that their individual needs, preferences, and aspirations are met. It also involves giving individuals access to information and advice about their care so that they can make informed decisions.

Personalisation is based on various principles, including the right to choice, independence, privacy, dignity, respect, partnership, and inclusion. These principles enable individuals to determine the type of care and support they need and to have a say in how their care and support are delivered.

Personalisation also involves giving individuals access to the resources they need to manage their care, including information, advice, and support, as well as access to technology that can help to improve health outcomes. Through personalisation, individuals can take a more active role in managing their care, which can improve outcomes and reduce reliance on healthcare services.

1.2 Explain how personalisation can benefit individuals

Personalisation in health and social care has become increasingly important in recent years, as it has been seen to have a positive effect on the well-being of individuals. Personalisation is the process of tailoring services to an individual’s specific needs and preferences, allowing them to make decisions based on their own experiences and values. This approach contrasts with the traditional one-size-fits-all approach used in health and social care services.

Personalisation has been seen to benefit individuals in various ways. Firstly, it allows them to control their care and make decisions that best suit their needs. This is especially important for those with complex or long-term health conditions, as they can choose their treatments and care plans rather than following a predetermined one. Additionally, personalisation can help individuals feel more comfortable and secure in their care, as they have the opportunity to have a say in the decisions that are made.

Personalisation also allows individuals to access tailored support and services, which can benefit those with mental health conditions or learning difficulties. Tailored support is important for these individuals, as it ensures that their needs are met in the best possible way. Additionally, personalisation can help individuals build trust with their care providers, as they feel that their opinions are being heard and taken into account, leading to a more positive relationship.

Personalisation can also help individuals feel empowered and respected in their care, as they are given the opportunity to make decisions about their care rather than following the instructions of others. This can be particularly beneficial for those who are vulnerable or have had limited control in the past.

Personalisation can be beneficial for individuals in health and social care, as it allows them to take control of their care, access tailored support and services, build trust with their care providers, and feel empowered and respected in their care.

1.3 Explain the relationship between rights, choice and personalisation

Rights, choice, and personalisation are all integral to health and social care. Rights refer to an individual’s entitlement to specific services and resources, as well as their right to be treated with respect and dignity. Choice is the ability to make decisions about one’s own life, including the care and support that is provided. Personalisation is when individuals are empowered to take control of their care and support to achieve the outcomes that are important to them.

These three elements are interconnected and are essential for providing quality health and social care. Rights are the foundation of health and social care, as they ensure that individuals have access to the care and support they need. Rights give individuals the power to control their care and support rather than having it imposed upon them.

Choice is an important part of health and social care, as it allows individuals to determine the type of care and support they receive. This includes being able to choose their care provider, the type of care they receive, and the times they receive it. Without choice, individuals can feel powerless and unable to control their care and support.

Personalisation is the process of empowering individuals to take control of their care and support. This includes ensuring that individuals are involved in the decision-making process and that their wishes and preferences are considered. Personalisation is not just about getting individuals what they want; it is also about helping them to identify and meet their own goals.

Rights, choice, and personalisation are essential components of health and social care. These elements are interconnected, and when combined, they give individuals the power to take control of their care and support. This ensures that individuals receive the care and support that is right for them, which leads to better outcomes for all involved.

1.4 Identify legislation and other national policy documents that promote personalisation

In the UK, personalisation of health and social care is promoted through various legislation and national policy documents. The main legislation that promotes personalisation in health and social care is the Care Act 2014. This act introduced new rights and responsibilities for people receiving care or support services. It also introduced the Care and Support Planning process, which requires local authorities to work with individuals to identify their needs and develop personalised care plans. Additionally, the act introduced the right to a personal budget, which allows individuals to use public funds to purchase their care and support services.

Another critical piece of legislation that promotes personalisation is the Health and Social Care Act 2012. This act introduced the concept of ‘personalised care’, which requires health and social care providers to work with individuals to design and deliver care packages that are tailored to their individual needs. The National Health Service (NHS) Long-Term Plan is a national policy document promoting personalisation. This plan outlines various initiatives to improve personalised care, such as giving people more choices and control over their care and introducing new digital technology to support people with long-term conditions.

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 also promotes personalisation. This act promotes the right of individuals to make decisions about their care and support. It also places a duty on care providers to support individuals in making their own decisions and to respect their right to make decisions that are not in their best interests. Additionally, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published various guidance documents that promote personalisation in health and social care. These documents provide guidance on how to design and deliver personalised care and support services and how to ensure that these services meet the needs of individuals.

2.1 Explain the local and national systems that are designed to support personalisation

Personalisation in the UK health and social care system is a growing trend that aims to provide individuals with tailored care and support that meets their unique needs and preferences. To achieve this, several local and national systems have been implemented to support personalisation across the country.

One of the key systems that support personalisation is Personalised Care and Support Planning. This system involves the creation of a care plan that is tailored to the individual’s needs and preferences, taking into account their physical, mental, and social well-being. This ensures that the care and support provided is specific to the individual and address their unique needs.

Personal Health Budgets is another system that allows individuals to have control over the funding for their care and support. This system enables individuals to choose the services that best meet their needs, giving them more autonomy and control over their care.

The Integrated Care System is a system that brings together different health and social care providers to work together in a coordinated way to provide tailored care and support to individuals. This ensures that all aspects of the individual’s care are considered and that there is continuity of care.

Self-Directed Support is another system that allows individuals to have control over their care and support, including the choice of who provides it and how it is delivered. This system gives individuals more autonomy and control over their care, allowing them to make choices that suit their needs and preferences.

Community-Based Service is a system that provides support to individuals in their own homes or in their local community rather than in hospital or residential care settings. This system enables individuals to receive care and support in familiar and comfortable surroundings, making the care experience more personalised.

Personal Assistants is a system that allows individuals to employ their own personal assistants to provide care and support in their own homes. This system enables individuals to receive care and support from someone they trust and who is familiar with their needs and preferences.

The Care Act 2014 is legislation that sets out the rights of individuals to receive personalised care and support and places a duty on local authorities and other care providers to support this. This legislation ensures that individuals have the right to receive personalised care and support and that care providers are held accountable for providing this.

The National Health Service (NHS) Long Term Plan is a plan that sets out the vision for the NHS to provide more personalised, community-based care, with a focus on prevention and early intervention. This plan aims to ensure that individuals receive care and support that is tailored to their needs, with a focus on preventing illness and promoting well-being.

2.2 Describe the impact that personalisation has on the process of commissioning social care

Personalisation has had a significant impact on the commissioning of health and social care services in recent years. It represents a shift from traditional models of service delivery, where providers were responsible for all aspects of an individual’s care, to more choice-based approaches where individuals can shape their packages based on what works best for them.

Under personalised models, individuals are supported by professionals such as case workers or social workers who provide guidance and advice about available services that might meet their needs. This means that people have much greater control over how they access and use the support they need to live independently in their communities rather than having it decided by health professionals or commissioners. As a result, people have much greater autonomy over decisions relating to themselves, allowing them to plan better and make choices around what suits them best regarding managing long-term conditions (for example, diet), help with daily living activities (e.g. help with shopping) or being part of broader community activities – if these are important to them.

By promoting personalisation and self-directed support, commissioners can reduce unnecessary bureaucracy, administrative costs, and waiting times as individuals take ownership of their care needs. This has also enabled increased flexibility in how services are commissioned as people’s needs change (or become more complex). In addition, enabling people to access a greater range of services than would have been possible under traditional models reduces the likelihood of inappropriate institutional care being used for those who could be safely supported at home with the right level of assistance. Furthermore, working in collaboration with service users to create solutions that work best for them ensures that resources are targeted towards individualised packages tailored according to an individual’s assessed need, resulting in better outcomes and value for money from existing funds.

Commissioning based on a personalised approach has enabled health professionals/commissioners to understand better what matters most to an individual when accessing or providing healthcare so that everyone can meet their objectives while staying safe and well. This can lead to greater efficiencies, better outcomes, and cost savings for all involved, ultimately making services more effective, timely, and tailored to individual needs.

2.3 Explain how direct payments and individual budgets support personalisation

Personalisation in health and social care is a way of providing services that are tailored to meet the individual needs of a person. This approach can help ensure better outcomes for service users, as it gives them control over their care and enables them to decide how they wish to receive support.

Direct payments are cash payments made directly from local authorities or the NHS to people who have eligible needs that have been identified through an assessment process. People can use this money themselves (or with their representative) to purchase goods, services, or both, which will meet their assessed needs, enabling people with eligible requirements flexibility over what they choose and how they receive support.

Individual budgets are personalised amounts of funding provided by local authorities so that individuals receiving long-term social care packages can manage themselves within agreed parameters laid out by professional assessments against eligibility criteria at regular review points. A range of options is usually available, such as self-directed budgeting via direct payment schemes (an amount paid directly to the service user or an appointed representative to purchase their care), individual service funds (a managed budget where a provider or commissioner can control how funding is allocated), or through third-party budgets (allowing a nominated person, such as a family member, friend, or paid advocate to manage to spend on behalf of the service user).

Direct payments and individual budgets provide people with greater choice over how they receive support. This helps ensure that services are tailored around individuals’ needs rather than having care packages dictated by local authorities. People have more freedom to decide what kind of assistance they need, who provides it, when it takes place, and how much money is spent on this support. Moreover, giving individuals control over their well-being leads them to become more self-sufficient in managing any health conditions, which can have long-term positive impacts on physical health and mental well-being. As such, direct payments and individual budgets play an essential role in personalisation within health and social care settings.

3.1 Explain how person-centred thinking, person-centred planning and person-centred approaches support personalisation

Person-centred thinking, planning, and approaches are core to the principles of personalisation in health and social care. Personalisation puts people at the centre of decisions about their support needs and enables them to take control of their own lives.

Person-centred thinking involves taking the time to build a relationship with an individual and getting to know them better for a more meaningful conversation around any decisions they might need help with or services they could benefit from. It helps practitioners understand how an individual wants things done based on what is important to them, focusing on what works best for each person rather than offering generic solutions that may not meet their unique requirements.

The next step is putting this understanding into practice using Person-Centred Planning (PCP). This takes the information gathered through person-centred thinking conversations and applies it practically by producing tailored plans that cover everything from day-to-day routines right up to longer-term aspirations such as employment or hobbies if desired by the individual being supported. PCP is empowering for individuals as it helps them to plan and control how they want their support delivered.

Person-centred approaches provide the structure that guides all of this work by promoting inclusion, choice, and independence. It encourages practitioners to listen and involve people in any decisions affecting them, such as adjusting services when changes are needed or planning a new role within a team. Person-centred approaches value diversity while ensuring appropriate care, or support is provided, ultimately creating an environment that promotes autonomy, respect, and dignity for everyone involved, regardless of circumstance or background.

Person-centred thinking, planning, and approach underpin personalisation in health & social care by enabling individuals to make decisions that are right for them individually, with meaningful engagement at every step along the way.

3.2 Describe how personalisation affects the balance of power between individuals and those providing support

Personalisation is a concept that has increasingly been adopted by health and social care services in the UK. It is based on the idea that individuals receiving support should have the ability to make decisions about how and when they access services and how their care is tailored to meet their individual needs. Personalisation seeks to empower individuals and shift the balance of power away from providers of support and towards those receiving it.

The traditional model of health and social care provision involves service users being passive recipients of care, with decisions about the type and level of support being made by providers. In contrast, personalisation allows individuals to take an active role in their care, with decisions being made in partnership between the service user and the provider. This shift in power is evident in the way that people receiving support are encouraged to develop a ‘personalised care plan’, which outlines their individual needs and preferences.

Personalization also encourages service users to become more empowered by taking control of their care. This can include managing their finances or arranging community support services rather than relying on providers to do this for them. This shift in power is further enhanced by the use of direct payments, which give individuals the opportunity to purchase the care and support that best meets their needs from a range of sources.

In addition, personalisation has enabled a move away from the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to care towards a model that considers the individual needs and preferences of service users. This has enabled providers to be more responsive to the needs of individuals by providing tailor-made support packages rather than a pre-determined set of services.

Personalisation has had a significant impact on the balance of power between individuals and those providing support in health and social care. It has helped to empower individuals and give them more control over their care, allowing them to make decisions about their care that best meet their needs.

3.3 Give examples of how personalisation may affect the way an individual is supported from day to day

Personalisation is an important concept in health and social care because it gives people more control over the services they receive, as opposed to a one-size-fits-all approach. Personalised support can support individuals in achieving their goals by providing them with more choice, flexibility, and control over how they are supported in their daily lives.

Personalised care, for instance, might entail creating a person-centred plan that outlines specific needs that must be met with each service or intervention offered. These plans also provide direction for professionals working in the health and social care sectors, as well as family members, on how to provide adequate support for individuals in need. It could cover topics like proper nutrition plans, exercise requirements, ways to manage mental health issues (like cognitive behavioural therapy), physical therapies that may be beneficial, and so on. Individual preferences are thus taken into account when healthcare providers provide them with any sort of assistance. This improves relationships between the service user and their carers because they are now working together to achieve a common goal.

Personalised support is also important in promoting independence for individuals who require assistance with daily living tasks such as dressing, eating meals, or managing medication. This could include activities like providing instruction on how to complete these tasks, assisting people in learning coping strategies when confronted with difficult situations and empowering individuals by allowing them to choose what types of services they receive or which professionals they work with, among other things. Healthcare providers can ensure that each person receives tailored support that meets their specific needs and goals by using this approach.

Personalisation in health and social care benefits both the individual seeking assistance and wider society; by enabling better collaboration between service users and providers, it encourages better communication and understanding regarding complex issues affecting those in need of extra help on a daily basis, ultimately reducing costs associated with illness/long term disability, etc.

4.1 Analyse the skills, attitudes and approaches needed by those providing support or brokering services, in order to implement personalisation

Personalisation in health and social care requires specific skills, attitudes, and approaches from those providing support or brokering services. Primarily, it is essential for them to have a thorough understanding of the philosophy of personalisation as well as its practical implications. This should include knowledge of the applicable legal frameworks in this field so that they can assist people in making informed decisions that are within their rights. They should also understand how budgets are managed in personalised care systems so that they can guide service users through this process if necessary.

Additionally, those providing support or brokering services must demonstrate strong interpersonal skills when interacting with service users, such as attentive listening and clear communication. They need to be able to determine an individual’s needs by asking appropriate questions and being adaptable enough to take on different perspectives while still maintaining personal and professional boundaries with all parties involved, including colleagues from other organisations who may be involved in the care provided.

Those providing support or brokering services must adopt an attitude of empathy and respect for the autonomy of the service user. They must understand how personalisation increases people’s level of control over their own lives and how this results in better quality-of-life outcomes. This can include demonstrating a willingness to assist in all aspects, such as assisting them in finding suitable care options, accompanying them when visiting potential providers, or simply acting as a supportive sounding board when making difficult decisions about their health and social care needs.

It is critical that those providing assistance maintain an approach that focuses on empowering individuals with knowledge rather than dictating what should be done because each person has different preferences depending on their circumstances, even if they have similar problems or goals, such as improving health outcomes. They must also be patient while allowing enough time during consultations for clients to absorb information and achieve the best results for them properly.

Those providing support or brokering services must understand the principles and implications of personalisation in health and social care, as well as have interpersonal skills, a respectful attitude toward service users, and an empowerment-focused approach when implementing this model within their organisations.

4.2 Identify potential barriers to personalisation

The government has adopted personalisation in health and social care as a model for providing tailored services to individuals. Although this approach has made significant progress since its inception, there are still numerous potential barriers to overcome when implementing personalised services. These include organisational factors, cultural beliefs and values, financial constraints, communication challenges between practitioners and service users, and other resources such as a lack of staff training or specialised skills required to deliver individualised care plans.

Organisational factors have frequently hampered the success of personalisation efforts within healthcare organisations, owing to the lack of adequate systems or processes to support such an individualised approach. Furthermore, existing organisational structures can lead to staff members developing preconceived notions about specific individuals, which may prevent them from properly taking their wishes into account when developing personalised plans for each person’s needs.

Cultural beliefs and values are also important in terms of healthcare personalisation, as there is no one-size-fits-all solution. People from various backgrounds and cultures may hold opposing views on what services should be provided to them or what care plans should be prioritised.

Financial constraints can also be an impediment to providing personalised care plans. Organisations require adequate funding sources for each case, and there are frequently insufficient resources allocated within health organisations for the implementation of personalised strategies.

Furthermore, communication barriers between practitioners and service users can limit the efficacy of any efforts to provide tailored support packages, making it difficult to accurately gauge a person’s wishes before putting together an appropriate plan that meets their specific needs. Staff members who lack the specialised skills required to implement complex changes may create a bottleneck, limiting the ability of health and social care organisations to provide personalised services.

There are a number of potential roadblocks that can stymie personalisation efforts within health and social care organisations. Organisational factors, cultural beliefs and values, financial constraints, communication difficulties between practitioners and service users, and a lack of staff training or specialised skills required for delivering tailored plans are examples of these.

4.3 Describe ways to overcome barriers to personalisation in day-to-day work

Personalisation is a key element in health and social care services, as it enables individuals to shape their own care plans, providing more tailored and person-centred care. However, there are a number of barriers to personalisation in day-to-day work, which can make it difficult to provide the best possible care for individuals. Here are some ways to overcome these barriers:

Training and Education: Training and education are essential to ensuring staff are equipped to provide personalised care. Staff should be trained on how to support individuals in developing their care plans, as well as how to be proactive in helping individuals to identify their goals and preferences. Additionally, staff should be educated on working with individuals to ensure they are empowered and have a voice in their care decisions.

Collaborative Working: Collaboration between health and social care providers is key to providing personalised care. By working together, providers can share knowledge and expertise, as well as resources, to ensure individuals receive the best possible care. This includes creating teams of professionals who are dedicated to helping individuals to develop their care plans, as well as creating multi-disciplinary teams to provide more holistic care.

Communication: Good communication between staff, individuals, and their families is essential to providing personalised care. This includes listening to individuals and their families to gain insight into their needs and preferences, as well as providing them with clear and accurate information about their care. Additionally, staff should ensure that individuals are actively involved in all aspects of their care, from decision-making to goal-setting.

Flexibility: Providing a flexible approach to care is essential for personalisation. This includes offering different levels of care, such as day-care and respite care, to ensure that individuals can choose the care that best suits their needs. Additionally, providers should be flexible in their approach to care and willing to adapt care plans to ensure that individuals remain in control and are supported in their choices.

Implementing these strategies, health and social care providers can ensure that individuals receive the best possible care by providing personalised care plans. This will enable individuals to shape their own care plans and ensure that their needs and preferences are met.

4.4 Describe types of support that individuals or their families might need in order to maximise the benefits of a personalised service

Personalised services in health and social care are designed to meet the individual needs of those receiving care and their families. To maximise the benefits of such services, it is important to provide necessary support and resources to both the individual and their family. The type of support needed will depend on the individual’s needs and circumstances but may include:

  • Information and advice: Reliable information about the individual’s condition, treatment options, and care services available can help them make informed decisions about their care and support.
  • Training and education: To ensure individuals and their families can make the most of a personalised service, they may need access to training and education, such as basic training on how to use medical equipment and more in-depth education on the condition.
  • Financial support: Financial assistance can be invaluable in helping individuals and their families make the most of a personalised service, such as help with transport costs or funding for certain treatments or equipment.
  • Counselling and support groups: Access to counselling or support groups can provide comfort and support for individuals and their families, helping them cope with the physical and emotional impact of their condition and share experiences with others.
  • Care coordination: Care coordinators can provide support in managing care and ensure the individual is receiving the right services at the right time.
  • Respite care: Respite care can provide a break for carers and an opportunity for the individual to access social activities and support.

These are just a few examples of the types of support that individuals and their families may need to maximise the benefits of personalised service in health and social care. With the right support, individuals and their families can be sure they are receiving the best possible care and support.

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